REVOLUTION IN ART


Revolution & Renewal

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Art is never static, its vocabulary evolves as artists seek innovative and personal modes of expression, and of responding to the reality around them. 

The works in this section illustrate different forms of change in art, from the search for heightened expressionism of Hellenistic sculptors to the commitment to direct stone carving of Eric Gill.


NB: For the full visual experience we recommend viewing the exhibition on desktop. Click on the images to find out more.   

Boxers is a significant work in Gill's oeuvre. It brings to attention the artist's brilliant, even daring combinations of colour with a dynamic and rare secular subject. As well as intimating a troubling and unresolvable struggle within Gill between matters of the spirit and of the flesh, the rich craftsmanship of his direct carving technique gives Boxers a presence that is serene, substantial, and unlike anything else in British stone sculpture of the early twentieth century.

PIANO NOBILE

"The paintings of François de Nomé, who was active in Rome and Naples in the first decades of the seventeenth century, were very soon considered "revolutionary" with respect to the art of his contemporaries.

GALERIE CANESSO

"Hertford Estate is part of a series of works by Coventry that nod to his late-twentieth century experiences of the inaccessible and undesirable living conditions of mass housing - buildings nonetheless created with optimism, and the modernist utopian approach to architecture of post-war Britain. Visually, it also cleverly references the artistic language of the Russian-Suprematist, Kasimir Malevich."

THE FINE ART SOCIETY

"Pol Mara is better known by his moniker, an acronym which stood for "Pour Oublier Laideur. Métamorphoses, Amour, Rêve, Amitié." ("To forget ugliness. Metamorphosis, love, dreams, friendship").

...his artwork has both a hallucinatory and revelatory quality that asks viewers to re-appraise their idea of the world around them."

AGNEWS GALLERY

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